Know your Local History 5? Revealed

So earlier I posed a question. There were some good answers and both guessed correctly the location of Carton House. Andy perhaps guessed Connolly’s Folly? Not correct I’m afraid. Good guess Patrick, and spot on with location (I did cycle through some greens and fairways)! However, history books inform me that the tower is known as ‘The Prospect Tower. Not much is know about it, all I can find about is is that:

1. It was built by the Talbot family who leased the estate from the Fitzgeralds

2. Not much is known about it!

Though I may be mistaken? Can you offer insight into your ideas of it being names Tyrconnell Tower, and a famine relief project?

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Sources: Ma Nuad by Mary Cullen

Exploring Maynooth: Five Self-Guide Historical Walks by Maynooth Local History

Know Your History 3 Revealed

So earlier I asked where you would find this place.

Andy Neil wins for his correct answer (though Leanie was a close second!) of location- it is indeed found by the harbour on the road that runs down to the roost, or here if that doesn’t make sense. It’s not an old minister’s house however, but a good guess.

It’s a house called Geraldine Hall. Originally built in 1702, a later building was built by the Duke of Leinster in 1770 before it was demolished and a new front built in 1859 as a Church of Ireland Parish school. One of its main objectives was to convert Catholic students into Protestants ( so I’m told), but this it failed to do. It continued as a school until it closed around 1935. It then became a social club and it was extended at the back in 1941. Later it was used by the CYMA but now its held in trust for the use of the people of Maynooth (THAT’S US!).

 

Sounces:  Maynooth (Ma Nuad) by Mary Cullen

Cannonballs and Croziers: A History of Maynooth edited by John Drennan

 

Know Your Local History 2 Revealed

So AGES ago I asked you where you would find this:

 

So you’ll find the plaque here at Maynooth Library (note my bike included!). Robert Emmet had his rebellion in 1803. We’re told that ‘Maynooth was in arms’. The Duke of Leinster went to the people to persuade them to put down their weapons and they did so, piling them up at Carton. This does go against the plaque which commemorates the people! Ah well…

 

References:

http://www.maynooth.org